Monthly Archives: November 2016

Tonella Hits the Right Note

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Tonella the mini lounge chair designed by Sweden’s Note Design Studio for Sancal, has just experienced two additions to the family. Can kids arrive into the world before their parents? Who knows, it’s all a bit chicken and egg for me but what I do know is that based on the reception baby Tonella received at Salone del Mobile in 2015, a collection was just begging to be born.

Tonella mini was designed specifically for areas that were spatially challenged shall we say. Be it for residential or public use, the chair was built for nooks and crannies, and what it lacked in size, it made up for in strength, comfort and appeal. After all size isn’t everything don’t you know?

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Roll on 2016, and suddenly one becomes three via the addition of a lounge chair and sofa.

There are varying reports about from where the inspiration for Tonella bloomed. Some say it all started at a vanity table, others say that Marie Antoinette’s lavish, playful style was the muse. Sancal aren’t exactly newbys to French furniture, they started out manufacturing classic, French-style chairs back in the 70’s. Now in conjunction with Note, they’ve revisited their roots and borrowed from the past.

Wine barrels are commonplace in Yecla (Sancal’s hometown) as it happens to be wine country, and the metal bars that make up Tonella’s frame are reminiscent of the wooden staves used in the barrels. One could even argue this fact is a major contender in the inspiration stakes.

Plush, lush, and wonderfully comfortable, Tonella is a beautiful and refined collection that is sure to be a mainstay in Sancal’s catalogue for years to come.

Eat your heart out Marie Antoinette. tonella_lounge_0003_tonella_1442

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Zen and the Art of Antii Kotilainen

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Last week we blogged about Arper’s intrinsic understanding of colour, and the sublime tones that they apply to their product. That led us to consider other collections where Arper have displayed complete assurance when creating colourways that identify the design as much as its form does.

The Catifa collection is case in point of inspirational use of colour, but as Arper have a variety of furniture ranges each with their own unique colourway, we thought we’d walk you through another stunner.

Aava by Finnish designer Antti Kotilainen, was once upon a time available in timber only. However the chair has recently been released with a polypropylene shell, in you guessed it, a combination of colours that take the design to a whole new level and in a wildly different direction than its timber counterpart.

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I would describe them as colours that are not very obvious if you like. Almost like you wouldn’t think of using or even really liking them unless you take the time to consider them appropriately. And then they smack you over the head with their gorgeousness. Aava whispers of a longing for natural surroundings, the ocean, pebbles, forests and sunlight.
That’s my description anyway but what do I know. Why not take the concept behind Aava from the man himself;

1. What is your approach to design?
Design work is based–quite inherently–on observation. A designer observes his environment, his own emotions and life-experiences, and also the work at hand. Only by observing closely the world around him–culture and nature alike–can a designer come up with products that he knows will enhance one’s surroundings and to be of use to many.

2. What is your philosophy on furniture design?
All pieces of furniture take their size and their basic gestalt from the human body. Furniture design is communication: it mediates human emotions, meddles in with them, and functions as their atmospheric seedbed. Much like music does.

3. What is your design ethic?
I believe that a soft-tone can make a more convincing argument than shouting out loud. When a designer has the patience to give his products temperate and soft-spoken expression, he can expect people to respond to them better and more willingly all over the world.

4. How do you evaluate good design?
Good design usually manifests in organic, effortless and indisputable appearance, combined with practicability and convenience. When the manufacturing process and the use of the product become one with the perfected form one gets an impression of something inevitable and absolute. Absolute as a paper clip.

*Interview is courtesy of Arper Stories – Interview with Antii Kotilainen

Arper

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